Attention Hobby Bloggers!

Usually, hobby bloggers solve blogging problems themselves on a daily basis depending on their skill level and on how complex the problems are.

Hobby bloggers, don’t read this if you can solve all your internet and technical issues with your free blogging platform, WordPress.com, Blogger, etc.!

Hobby Bloggers Solve Blogging Problems

The Problem With Spam

(Five years ago)

I wasbeginning to feel jinxed as I struggled technologically to blog. First I had my problems just learning the ropes, then I started jumping unannounced and uninvited into people’s spam boxes. That all came to a head when WordPress.com shut me down for cutting and pasting in a spam comment that had a spammy Gravatar into one of my posts.

Yikes, I sailed to the end of the world and fell off the internet safety web.

Note: (The solution – appeal to WordPress.com. Fortunately, they reinstated my blog.)

Landing In Spam

(a few days later five years ago)

Considering my spam troubles, I was almost afraid to write comments. Tonight I had no comments pending, and four comments sat in MY SPAM file.  Guess what? Three of the four SPAM comments were MINE! hahaha. Good think I checked.

Moral of that story – Check your Spam file from time to time.

Second, when I set my WordPress.com account up I linked it to MY Facebook account so my posts would share to my timeline automatically.  I also manage a Facebook account for San Joaquin Valley Council for the Social Studies, which also had a personal Facebook account.

Note: (Organizations should NOT have personal FB accounts. I deleted the account this year even though it had about 500 followers. Create a page or group for organizations or both.)

Somehow all my posts from my WordPress.com website were published on that account as well. So I pressed x on that Facebook account under the Sharing Setting on my WordPress.com account. I was surprised to discovered that I had 198 followers on Facebook who showed up as statistics on this website. I have no idea how that happened!!!

Note: (WP.com lists the number of FB followers you have if you publish to your personal account or page whether or not those friends visit your site.)

The Cost of Solving Blog Problems on my Free WordPress.com Site

We live in the country where internet service is at a premium.

So I thought you might want to know what happened because of my disaster.  (My website was removed from the internet.)

Vince likes to keep me happy, and blogging makes me happy. Instead of making me wait until Wildblue fills my gigabyte food bowl again, he bought me two gigabytes of service to tide me until the next service month.  We answered emails and comments together for a half hour, and he checked the gigabyte meter.  Without downloading anything, we had used one gigabyte of data.

Hobby Bloggers Solve Blogging ProblemsWe hadn’t pulled up any pictures, visited any outside websites.  So we went to his office, and I quickly published the post I worked on last night from 12:00 – 2:40 a.m using the company’s cheap unlimited data plan.

Gigabytes of data are free out in the country where we live and unlimited from 12:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. local time.  Then I answered emails in the evening for about forty-five minutes.  Poof, the other gigabyte disappeared into our internet provider’s ravenous cyber tummy.

At that point, I got messages like, “Your email has not been sent.”

So Vince called Wildblue and insisted that a few emails do not create even megabytes of information, let alone gigabytes.  One gigabyte equals 1,000 megabytes. Even photos can be done in megabytes, and I avoided photos.  I sent my Foothill Magazine friend a link to my post instead of sending photos.  The technical support person agreed with V, and credited our account for the 2 gigabytes, and gave us unlimited gigabytes that should go into effect by TOMORROW NIGHT until they figure out our problem.

Meanwhile, I waited until midnight to start writing my posts for the rest of the week, and It took until about 12:20 for even Wildblue’s normal unlimited gigabytes to kick in.  I couldn’t get on even with the modem directly connected to my computer.  Vince pressed some magic buttons, and after about 20 minutes he was able to pull up my screen.

To Wildblue’s credit, they helped us.  Thank y’all for being so patient and visiting me when I haven’t been able to visit you back for about the last week or more.

Internet service is part of the cost of both professional and hobby blogging. Solving problems ate up my internet data.

You Won’t Like This Problem

In addition to writing every day I try to read a fair number of blogs, and I was in the habit of pressing the “like” button because I couldn’t comment after I WordPress.com banned me from the blogosphere. So, I tried pressing “Like.” Even though my blog had been restored, I couldn’t like anyone’s work.  So If you thought I didn’t like you, you might have been wrong.

Note: (That problem cleared up on its own, and I do not remember why or how.)

Most of the problems I had when I started blogging in 2012 had no overt solutions. Vampires roamed the cyberworld freely creating havoc in the night. Poltergeists ravaged blogs while we slept. Then just as mysteriously elves picked up the pieces and reassembled your blog so they were again usable. c

There was no logic in how a blog fell into disrepair and how it cleared up again.

Conclusion

Are WordPress.com blogs still vulnerable today? I still keep my account active so that I can speak to WordPress.com issues as well as WordPress.org. I have not experienced any problems recently, but I have five years of experience. I’m not pressing my blog to do what it can not do. I have much of my material saved and reworked and republished in this account. I am not so vulnerable.

There is a touch of that mystery that still surrounds the way blogs work. When they get too overwhelming, I have the help of a web developer, Daniel Renteria, who corrects my wrongs and straightens out my website to keep it functioning. I’ll be introducing him to you soon.

There are millions of hobby bloggers using WordPress.com. WordPress.com users published more than 595 million posts and more than 457 million comments in 2016.

What problems do you have blogging? Where do you turn for answers? How can Always Write meet your challenges and be a better blog?

Why You Should Worry When Sex Gratis Visits Your Website